Tag Archives: nature

Matilda

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We have the most gorgeous little guest. She has made a home beneath a big climbing Clematis that has soared up into a silver birch tree, using the rear wall of our shed as a windbreak. It really is a cosy nook. She allows us quite close to her, but the ears are pinned down, the eyes fixed our way, and she looks ready to flee if she must. When I do catch her unawares she is often grooming her pouch, so I assume there is young soon to be making that marathon journey to the safety of the pouch, or, already one ensconced.

Concensus is she is a Pademelon, or Thylogale billardierii.

We have called her Matilda, and our cats and alpacas seem quite happy to share the garden and paddock space with her when she does venture out to graze. I note she loves the new mown paddock run covered in clover and grass, and there is plenty of water available for her. She is very safe, as long as she stays out of my newly sown vegetable garden! I hope she lets us meet the baby.

Matilda has a good look to assess me, Friend or Foe? Stay of Flee?

Matilda has a good look to assess me, Friend or Foe? Stay of Flee?

Matilda decides to stay and out-wait me!

Matilda decides to stay and out-wait me!

 

 

A Brightling ramble

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Another glorious English summer’s day so off ¬†I went to the little village of Brightling. There is a walk in my AA maps called the Follies of Brightling, intriguing, what could that be about?

Well the first wonder came at the Brightling church, it has a HUGE pyramid in the grounds! John Fuller of Brightling, (1757 – 1834) amassed enough money to become both eccentric and community minded so while he concocted follies to be built to please his eccentricity and guests, he provided employment for local builders. But the church is also stunning in it’s own right, and apart from the lovely arches, stonework and windows the pews are filled with beautiful cushions of tapestry. I took the liberty of photographing 4, but there were many more just as varied and beautifully worked.

Beautifully worked kneeling cushions in the Brighlting Church

Beautifully worked kneeling cushions in the Brightling Church

Interior of Brightling Church

Interior of Brightling Church

It was a pleasure to leave a goodly donation at the Church and take a copy of Geoff Hutchinson’s booklet on John Fuller.

Walking on over fields I came to The Tower folly, surrounded by a small copse of trees in a paddock. I can imagine the fun that was had by guests at the time, the FOLLY of it all.

The Tower Folly at Brightling

The Tower Folly at Brightling

Walking on thru more fields and into Coblye wood I started to see pheasants and find out it is a pheasant raising area. Such gorgeous looking birds. Just before the wood catch a glimpse of the Temple Folly behind the cricket ground.

The Temple Folly

The Temple Folly

Pheasants of Coblye Wood

Pheasants of Coblye Wood

Crossing thru Prinkle Wood studded with bluebells underneath many shrubs and trees blossoming in all shades of pink and white and mauve the sounds of the woodland is such a treat. Birds are talking away to each other, and breeze has the trees rustling their leaves in constant conversation. It sounds like they are all so happy to have emerged from winter to find shiny new coats to boast about.

trees

Cross a road and enter Darwell wood, sharing some of the paths with horse riders, dog walkers, scurrying squirrels and rabbits.

Darwell Wood

Darwell Wood

Suddenly there is a covered conveyor belt stretching both ways for as far as I can see. It carries gypsum between Mountfield and Brightling.

Gypsum mining conveyor belt.

Gypsum mining conveyor belt.

I love the way old English buildings seem grafted into the landscape, I guess over the centuries they have nestled themselves into the very earth and fabric of their place.

buildings

This is such a lovely walk, about 6 miles and it took me 3 hours. So many follies I didn’t see on this walk; The Sugar Loaf, the Brightling Needle and the Observatory. Good on John Fuller!